Advisories/Updates

  • April 6 project update: Disassembly continues

    It’s been a busy week since Seattle Tunnel Partners lifted the SR 99 tunneling machine’s front end to the surface for repairs. Crews spent the first few days after the lift cleaning and disconnecting parts. Then, on Friday afternoon, they removed the machine’s bearing block and set it on a platform south of the cutterhead.
     
    Further disassembly will continue in the coming days, including removal of the main bearing. When the disassembly phase of STP’s repair effort is complete, manufacturer Hitachi Zosen will begin making repairs and enhancements (links to YouTube). You can continue to track STP’s work on our time-lapse cameras and follow @BerthaDigsSR99 on Twitter for updates. Don't forget to check out the other resources we've created to give you a fuller understanding of Bertha's story:
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  • New time-lapse video shows additional perspectives of Bertha lift

    The SR 99 tunneling machine's 2,000-ton front end has been safely on the ground for a couple of days, but it's worth revisiting how it got there. We created a video that shows the Bertha lift from three different perspectives. 

    Watch the Bertha lift time-lapse here (links to YouTube)

    You can continue to track STP’s work on our time-lapse cameras and follow @BerthaDigsSR99 on Twitter for updates. Don't forget to check out the other resources we've created to give you a fuller understanding of Bertha's story:

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  • March 31 project update: Bertha lift complete

    2:35 p.m. update: On Tuesday afternoon, Seattle Tunnel Partners safely placed the front end of the SR 99 tunneling machine on the repair platform located just south of the access pit. The set-down marked the end of a successful lift process that began early Monday. This time-lapse video shows the lift from a spot just north of the tunnel access pit.
     
    Crews will continue disassembling the machine’s 2,000-ton front end in the coming days, using the massive red crane that completed yesterday’s lift to arrange pieces on the repair site. Repair work will take place south of the pit beneath a large canopy that will soon be moved into place to protect the workers and machine pieces from the elements. 
     
    This was the fourth and final lift to bring pieces of the tunneling machine to the surface, a process explained in detail in our narrated video (links to YouTube). At 2,000 tons, this was also the largest lift crews undertook. In addition to the cutterhead, the newly removed drive unit section includes motors and parts that enable the cutterhead to rotate. It also houses the main bearing and seal system that will be replaced during repairs.
     
    You can continue to track STP’s work on our time-lapse camera and follow @BerthaDigsSR99 on Twitter for updates. 
     
     

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    On Monday, Seattle Tunnel Partners lifted the SR 99 tunneling machine’s front end from the access pit. The lifting process began early Monday morning with a series of tests to ensure the massive red crane performing the lift could handle the weight of the 2,000-ton section. The piece began rising from the pit around noon and was visible at the surface a few hours later. By 9 p.m., crews had positioned the piece above the platform where it will be set down for repairs.

    STP chose to wait until Tuesday morning to complete the lift with a fresh crew. You can track the conclusion of the lift on our time-lapse camera and follow @BerthaDigsSR99 on Twitter for updates.

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Program Spotlight

  • Tunnel’s two nerve centers taking shape

    State-of-the-art systems will be the key to maximizing safety and efficiency inside the SR 99 tunnel. Lighting and intelligent transportation systems (video cameras, traffic counters, variable message signs, etc.) will help ensure smooth traffic flow, while the ventilation, drainage and fire-suppression systems will help the tunnel meet the highest safety standards. To manage these systems, we’ll need nerve centers at each end of the tunnel. While they’re hard to see now, those … more