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Operations and Maintenance Manual, Computerized Pavement Condition Survey Unit

Description:

A computerized field pavement condition survey unit and an IBM PC/XT computer base office reader and analysis system were developed for use in the pavement management program used by WSDOT.

The pavement condition recording and computing device is a microprocessor controlled, data acquisition and reduction system which uses a combination of manual inputs and odometer readings to develop pavement condition reports. These reports are printed on the system printer and written to a standard compact magnetic tape cartridge along with the raw data for later inclusion in the Washington State Department of Transportation's pavement management data base.

The device, including all of its attendant equipment, is fully portable so that it may be used in any motor vehicle that has an odometer pulse generator (preferably producing approximately 4,000 TTL level counts per mile) and 12 Vdc power source.

The office system consists of an IBM PC/XT or AT microcomputer with a printer and a 20 megabyte cartridge tape drive. It also has the software needed to read, preview, analyze and convert the data for direct entry into WSDOT's pavement management system.

  • Date Published: February, 1985
  • Publication Number: WA-RD 77.2
  • Last Modified: August 18, 2007
  • Authors: Derald Christensen, Danny R. Haase, Senaka C.B. Ratnayake, Donald J. Hacherl.
  • Originator: Washington State Transportation Center (TRAC)
  • # of Pages: 326 p., 7,909 KB (PDF)
  • Subject: Automation, Condition surveys, Data collection, Data processing, Data recorders, Evaluation, Maintenance practices, Manuals, Measuring instruments, Microprocessors, Pavement management systems, Pavements, Portable equipment, Software, Surveys.
  • Keywords: Pavement management, automated pavement survey equipment, pavement surface condition survey.
  • Related Publications: Computerized Pavement Condition Survey Unit, (WA-RD 77.1).


This abstract was last modified April 29, 2008