Contents tagged with home

  • Driver alert: SR 99 closures continue through Wednesday morning, Aug. 27

    Know before you go

    Find current traffic information on WSDOT's travel tools page or SDOT’s traveler's information page.

    Closure information

    Drivers should plan ahead for SR 99 closures from Friday night, Aug. 22 to Wednesday morning, Aug. 27.

    • From 10 p.m. Friday, Aug. 22 to 5 a.m. Monday, Aug. 25, SR 99 will be closed in both directions from the West Seattle Bridge to Valley Street.
      • Northbound SR 99 will be open from South Royal Brougham Way and southbound SR 99 will be open from Columbia Street until midnight on Friday, Aug. 22 for exiting Seahawks traffic.
    • From 5 a.m. Monday, Aug. 25 to 5 a.m. Wednesday, Aug. 27, SR 99 will be closed in both directions from the south end of the Battery Street Tunnel to Valley Street.

    Other construction during the closure

    To minimize the need for additional closures, separate crews will complete the following work elsewhere along the SR 99 corridor during this time:

    • Utility work at Harrison Street
    • Concrete panel replacement in SODO
    • Expansion joint repairs on the Alaskan Way Viaduct near the Seneca Street off-ramp
    • Ivy removal from the viaduct

    Driver tips 

    The closure is expected to cause backups on city streets and increase delays on I-5. Travelers should consider the following:

     

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  • Sharing the road during the four-day closure of SR 99

    When State Route 99 closes for four straight days starting Friday night, Aug. 22, you can expect more congestion and delays on surface streets getting into and out of downtown Seattle. We’re expecting more bikes on the road as travelers try alternate ways to reach their destination.

    To keep everyone moving safely, drivers and bicyclists will need to be especially mindful of each other as they use crowded streets and intersections. Obeying the law is essential. In Washington state, bicycles are legally considered vehicles on the road. For cyclists, this means following the same rules of the road as drivers. For drivers, this means using best practices and treating cyclists as equals who have the same rights to the road as you.

    Here are a few common sense tips to help all commuters get along:

    For drivers

    • Yield to oncoming bicyclists when making a left turn at an intersection.
    • Yield to bicyclists when turning across a bike lane.
    • Look for passing bicyclists before opening a door that faces traffic.

     

    For bicyclists

    • Ride in the middle of the lane in slower traffic.
    • Pass on the left, where drivers can see you.
    • Use hand signals and make eye contact with drivers.


    Finally, both drivers and bicyclists should keep an eye out for pedestrians and remember that pedestrians have the right of way at crosswalks.

    Additional resources:

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  • What we’re doing to keep traffic moving during the four-day SR 99 closure

    We’ve been asking you to do your part to reduce congestion when SR 99 closes for four days starting Friday night, Aug. 22. That includes things like changing your commute habits and choosing an alternate way to get around.

    But what are we, the agencies tasked with keeping traffic moving during this closure, doing to help? Quite a bit, actually. Here’s a roundup of some of the steps we’re taking to help you and your fellow commuters through the closure.

    Washington … more

  • Seattle Tunnel Partners schedule update: Construction of the access pit’s underground walls will continue through August

    Today, Seattle Tunnel Partners notified us that building the underground walls of the circular pit (pdf 2.5 Mb) crews will use to access and repair the SR 99 tunneling machine will continue through August. While this date is later than anticipated, STP reports that tunneling is still expected to resume as scheduled in March 2015.

    Building a self-supporting, concrete ring that is 120 feet deep and 80 feet wide is no easy task, especially given the difficult ground conditions near South Jackson Street. STP crews have completed more than half of the underground piles and are working around-the-clock, seven days a week to complete the approximately 31 remaining piles.

    There are several reasons the work is taking longer than anticipated. One factor is the addition of 11 piles to the pit’s design, bringing the total number of piles to approximately 84. Crews are also working with exceptionally large interlocking piles, which are necessary to make the pit self-supporting without tiebacks or other reinforcements. A self-supporting pit is what will allow the tunneling machine to mine through its walls, but the large piles take longer to install than standard piles.

    While pile work continues, crews are making progress on other areas of the repair plan on schedule, including:

    • Shipping repair pieces: The new main bearing has arrived in Seattle and will be assembled closer to the time it’s needed, likely this fall.
    • Manufacturing repair pieces: Other repair pieces, such as the new outer seal ring, the thrust seal ring and bearing block are nearing completion. After these pieces are fabricated and inspected, Hitachi Zosen will ship them to Seattle.
    • Assembling a 300-ton crawler crane: This crane will be used to help assemble the 600-ton crawler crane. Pieces of that crane will arrive in September and assembly will begin shortly thereafter.
    • Assembling a 600-ton crawler crane: This crane will be used to assemble the modular lift tower (massive red crane) that will lift the largest pieces of the machine from the access pit. Parts of that crane will also arrive in September and assembly will begin in late September.
    • Assembling the 2,000-ton modular lift tower: Starting in late July and continuing through fall, crews will begin to stage the modular lift tower. Parts of the modular lift tower will arrive over the next several months beginning in late July.

     

    We will continue to update you on STP’s efforts to resume tunneling by March 2015. You can watch the access pit take shape on our time-lapse camera, and view photos of recent construction on Flickr

    Previous updates 

    June 16, 2014 update – Contractor announces details of repair work plan for the SR 99 tunneling machine

    May 13, 2014 update – Construction of access pit’s underground walls now underway

    May 8, 2014 update - With environmental review complete, access pit construction begins in earnest

    April 29, 2014 update - A summary of change orders on the SR 99 Tunnel Project

    April 21, 2014 update - SR 99 tunneling machine to resume digging in March 2015

    Click here to see a full archive of progress updates

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  • Traffic shift underway on State Route 99 near the stadiums

    Less than three years ago, crews demolished the southern mile of the Alaskan Way Viaduct. When they did, they shifted traffic onto a new section of State Route 99 south of downtown Seattle.

    Much of that new section of SR 99 is permanent, but the piece west of the stadiums is temporary. This curving stretch of road takes drivers around the SR 99 tunnel construction site and connects to the remaining section of the viaduct near South King Street. It’s nothing fancy, but it’s … more

  • Celebrate Bike Month on our new path

    Just in time for Bike Month, we opened a new permanent connection between the on-street bike lanes south of South Atlantic Street and the shared-use path from South King Street. Here’s a map that shows the improvements, which include:

    A dedicated, 14-foot-wide shared-use path with improved paving.

    Improved lighting.

    A separate northbound and southbound path for more efficient navigation.

    Signs warning of vehicles crossing the intersection of … more

  • The SR 99 tunnel contract you’ve never heard of

    You may have noticed more construction along State Route 99, just north of the Battery Street Tunnel. That work is part of the SR 99 Tunnel Project, but it has its own name – the North Access Project. It’s also being built under a completely different contract than the one we have with Seattle Tunnel Partners, the contracting team responsible for most of the tunnel work. A map of major contracts within the program can be found here (pdf 1.1 Mb).

    Our contractor for the North … more

  • SR 99 tunnel’s north portal taking shape near the Space Needle

    A few blocks northeast of the Space Needle, crews are building the north portal of the SR 99 tunnel. It’s a huge piece of the overall tunnel project, but it’s largely invisible to the thousands of people that pass by it every day.

    About the only place you can see the north portal taking shape is from the viewing deck of the Space Needle because most of the construction is underground, inside a pit that’s every bit as impressive as the launch pit where Bertha, the SR 99 … more

  • Lots to see inside the tunnel launch pit

    You can’t see much from the surface, but there’s a lot of work happening in the launch pit where tunneling started last summer. Last week, Seattle Tunnel Partners removed the giant steel frame that Bertha, the SR 99 tunneling machine, pushed against to start her drive into the tunnel. The frame is now on its way to be recycled.

    Work is also well underway to dismantle the temporary concrete tunnel rings Bertha installed to give her additional leverage at the start of her … more

  • Keeping the Alaskan Way Viaduct safe until the tunnel opens

    We're looking forward to opening the tunnel to traffic and demolishing the Alaskan Way Viaduct. It’s the reason we come to work each day. But until we take down the viaduct, it’s our job to protect it and keep it safely open to drivers.

    And so this weekend, as they do four times every year, WSDOT crews will inspect the viaduct. They’ll start by closing the structure to traffic on Saturday and Sunday. Then they’ll begin a methodical weekend of work measuring … more