Skip Top Navigation

Budget Information

I-5 - NE 117th St to SR 104 Pavement Repair


Project map of the work area.
Click here to view larger version of map.

Age, traffic, and weather have contributed to cracking in the pavement.
Cracking on I-5 from 50 years of traffic and weather has led to concrete in need of repair.

Status

August 2014

  • The contractor plans to begin installing construction signs the week of Aug. 4.
  • Overnight lane closures for this project are expected to begin the week of Aug. 11.
  • We awarded this project to Granite Construction Co. on June 27, 2014.
  • This project is similar to other pavement repair projects we have done along I-5 in Kent and Seattle.
  • Sign up to receive email updates about this project and other Seattle area topics. 

Overview

In summer 2014, crews will replace hundreds of concrete panels and grind out cracks and bumps on I-5 between Northeast 117th Street near Northgate and SR 104 in Mountlake Terrace. The work will help extend the life of the road and improve driver safety.

This project is similar to concrete grinding and replacement work WSDOT has performed on I-5 in Kent, Seattle near the Ship Canal Bridge, and I-405 near Bellevue.

Why is WSDOT repairing concrete panels from Northeast 117th Street to SR 104?

The pavement on I-5 through King County was first installed between 1962 and 1965. It was designed to last through the 1980s. High traffic volumes, age and weather have all contributed to the telling signs of failing pavement - cracks, bumps and what pavement engineers call spalling. Spalling is pavement that is flaking, chipping or crumbling apart. However you might describe it, the pavement is failing and it’s time for longer lasting repairs.

Repairing damaged concrete panels helps extend the life of I-5.
• Vehicles of varying weights pass over panels causing the concrete to flex. Cracked panels can’t flex properly, which leads to more cracking and damage.
• Normally, concrete panels expand and contract with seasonal temperature change. Cracked panels are no different, but become increasingly damaged when moisture freezes and thaws in the existing cracks.

Repairing or replacing cracked concrete panels helps keep drivers safe.
• Water can pool in sections of the highway. Drivers' wheels can lose traction when passing over pooled water at high speeds.
• Repairing concrete reduces bumps and cracks, making for a safer, smoother ride.

Doing the work now saves money in the long term and helps reduce the need for emergency repairs.

The End Result

Crews will grind and repair 300 of the worst concrete panels on this stretch of I-5. The work will help prolong the life of the road and provide a safer, smooth ride for drivers.

Project Benefits

Improved Safety – replacing cracked concrete panels and grinding out cracks and bumps makes for a smoother, safer ride for drivers

Extends the life of I-5 - reduces the need for emergency repairs, which are costly to taxpayers and can cause unwanted congestion during peak travel periods.

What is the project timeline?

  • Spring 2014 - The project advertised for competitive bidding.
  • The project was awarded to Granite Construction Co. on June 27, 2014.
  • Summer 2014 - Construction starts.
  • Spring 2014 - Construction is complete.

Financial Information

Financial Data for PIN 602510B, 602701I, 602708S, 627201F, 690200G
Funding Source Amount ($ in thousands)
2003 Gas Tax (Nickel Funding) $0
2005 Gas Tax (TPA) $0
Pre-Existing Funds (PEF) $588
Total $588

Project signage will reflect the cost of construction engineering, project bid award and sales tax.

How can I get more information?
Contact:

John Chi
WSDOT Project Engineer
Phone: (425) 225-8741
Email: chij@wsdot.wa.gov

Kris Olsen
WSDOT Communications
Phone: (206) 440-4704
Email: olsenk@wsdot.wa.gov

back to top